Prix Schläfli - Rewarding the best Swiss PhDs in the natural sciences

Plume Grand Duc - Prix Schläfli
Image: Caspar Klein
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Plume Grand Duc - Prix Schläfli
Plume Grand Duc - Prix Schläfli (Image: Caspar Klein)

The Prix Schläfli of the Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) is one of the oldest prizes in Switzerland. Since the first awarding in 1866, 115 young talents in different natural science disciplines have been distinguished.

The prize has the following aims:

  • Promote young talents (promotion of young scientists and support of academic excellence) in the different natural science disciplines;
  • Highlight the importance of young scientists in the Swiss research landscape;
  • Increase the Academy’s visibility in the Swiss science landscape.

  • News

Sebastian Völkel, Brian Schmidt, Vivien Bonvin, Maria Cruces and Hester Schutte, 69th Lindau meeting
  • 09.07.2019
  • News

69th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting 2019

The 69th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting dedicated to physics just ended. We had a great week of vivid discussions between 39 Nobel Laureates and 580 young scientists from 89 countries most of them Physicists but not only.
Plume Grand Duc - Prix Schläfli
  • 20.06.2019
  • News

Call Prix Schläfli 2020

The Prix Schläfli, one of the longest-running science prizes in Switzerland (since 1866), is awarded by the Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) to young scientists for excellent articles resulting from PhDs in each of the following natural science disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences and Astronomy.
Rebekka Wild: Prix Schläfli Biologie 2019
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • News

Rebekka Wild - On protein and other structures

On a beautiful spring day such at ETH Hönggerberg, we sit outside at the café to talk. Rebekka Wild seems very relaxed, as if she had nothing more important to do than enjoy the sun. However, appearances are deceptive: she works pretty much 150 per cent of a normal working day, reads specialist literature in the evenings - and yes, sometimes even a book.
Julie Zähringer (Prix Schläfli 2019) unterwegs ins Studiendorf Navana mit einer Piroge
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • News

Julie Zähringer - Bringing the extremes together

There is a small moment of confusion in our conversation with Julie Zähringer, which says a lot about her research and its particular challenges. She explained that she had done research "in an area" in which there was hardly any prior knowledge. By this, she did not mean a subject area, but a very concrete, physical one: Zähringer has worked on the margins of various nature reserves in Madagascar, where the local population is often caught in a mishmash of different national and international interests. So we are talking about geographical regions, and thus also about the people who live in them. We are therefore also talking about politics, local economies, and historically charged situations.
Murielle Delley: Prix Schläfli Chemie 2019
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • News

Murielle Delley - the privilege of life-long learning

When asked about her motivation to study chemistry, Murielle Delley explains that she has always wanted to know how things work. When it came to understanding what was happening around us - everyday science, so to speak - she was more attracted to chemistry than to physics, for example. Well, that was originally the case. Over the years she naturally also turned to more specific, less everyday problems, most recently the surfaces of catalysts.
Matteo Fadel: Prix Schläfli 2019 Physik
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • News

Matteo Fadel - Paradoxical entanglements

A labyrinth of mirrors, a shiny pot, countless cables and digital displays. Visiting Matteo Fadel at his workplace at the University of Basel, he first takes us to the laboratory where he tracks strange quantum phenomena. Somewhere in the midst of all this apparatus, several hundred atoms are trapped and brought into a state that still causes physicists a lot of headaches today.

A fortune for the SSNS

Alexander Friedrich Schläfli from Burgdorf died in 1863 in Bagdad. He left his fortune to the Swiss Society for Natural Sciences (SSNS) on condition that the “Society will award an annual prize to any question in physical science – Physical science always comprised the Physics and Natural Sciences (according to proceedings 1917, page 97). (…) The selection and the amount are at the discretion of the named Society.”

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Switzerland's candidates for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting are now also selected from among the candidates for the Schläfli Prize