Particle Physics

Particle physics probes the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions, which determine the structure and properties of the extreme diversity of matter in the universe. It aims at explaining what holds the world together in its most fundamental constituents.

Proton-Proton Collision (LHC, CERN)
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Proton-Proton Collision (LHC, CERN)
Proton-Proton Collision (LHC, CERN)

Modern physics relies on an elegant «Standard Model of particle physics», a quantum field theory based on three symmetries and a symmetry breaking. This theory describes and explains magnificently all experimental results obtained so far. With the discovery of the Higgs particle in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the last missing piece of the Standard Model has been experimentally confirmed. Experiments at CERN and at other international laboratories now continue to test the validity and limits of the Standard Model in ever widening scope. However, for a comprehensive understanding of the laws of nature a theory beyond the Standard Model is needed, which should include gravitation and explain the presence of dark matter and dark energy in the universe.

  • Events
  • News
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2019
Jul 1
2019
Jul 3
Hotel Victoria - CHIPP Plenary 2019
  • CHIPP
  • Conference
  • Education/Training
  • Seminar
  • Workshop
  • Kandersteg

CHIPP Plenary 2019

CHIPP annual plenary meeting for 2019 will be held in Kandersteg.
2019
Jul 1
2019
Jul 5
World Conference Science Journalists 2019
  • Conference
  • Lausanne

WORLD CONFERENCE OF SCIENCE JOURNALISTS: WCSJ 2019 in Lausanne

Organized by the Science Journalists' associations of Switzerland, France and Italy.
The city of Lausanne was chosen to host the 11th World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ) from 1 to 5 July 2019 at the SwissTech Convention Center, on the campus of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and the University of Lausanne (UNIL).
Swiss team at the 2019 European Physics Olympiad: Robin von Reding, Noah Roux, Ramón Buchenberger, Yanjun Zhou, Etienne Rösli
  • 06.06.2019
  • Wissenschafts-Olympiade
  • Press release

Drei Auszeichnungen für Schweizer Schüler an European Physics Olympiad

In die Schuhe eines Physikers schlüpften fünf Schweizer Gymnasiasten. Nach einer Experimental- und Theorieprüfung wurden drei von ihnen mit einer Honorable Mention ausgezeichnet.
Matteo Fadel: Prix Schläfli 2019 Physik
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • News

Matteo Fadel - Paradoxical entanglements

A labyrinth of mirrors, a shiny pot, countless cables and digital displays. Visiting Matteo Fadel at his workplace at the University of Basel, he first takes us to the laboratory where he tracks strange quantum phenomena. Somewhere in the midst of all this apparatus, several hundred atoms are trapped and brought into a state that still causes physicists a lot of headaches today.
Pokale Prix Schläfli
  • 21.05.2019
  • Swiss Academy of Sciences
  • Press release

SCNAT honours the four best dissertations in sciences

Controlling the amount of phosphate in cells, the processes involved in catalysts, land use in Madagascar and a paradox of quantum physics – these are the topics for which the Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) has awarded the Prix Schläfli 2019 to the four most important insights gained by young researchers at Swiss universities. Murielle Delley (Chemistry), Matteo Fadel (Physics), Rebekka Wild (Biology) and Julie Zähringer (Geosciences) receive the prize for the findings arrived at in their dissertations. For the first time, six of the candidates for the Prix Schläfli in Physics were also selected to participate in the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting.
XENON1T installation in the underground hall of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The three storey building houses various auxiliary systems. The cryostat containing the LXeTPC is located inside the large water tank next to the building.
  • 21.05.2019
  • News
  • Press release

The XENON1T experiment in the Italian Gran Sasso Laboratory has measured the most protracted radioactive decay ever

Radioactive waste from nuclear power plants can take a long time to decay. For plutonium-239 the half-life - that is the time until half of the atoms of a sample have decayed - is no less than 24,000 years. But this is nothing compared to the half-life of the noble gas xenon-124, as an international research team with collaborators from the University of Zurich has now shown.

Swiss physicists in dialog with the society

Swiss physicists want to make their fascinating research understandable to the interested public and to debate its meaning for our society together with representatives of other fields.